Tax Returns On The Line 📝

Patrick Semansky / AP file

Patrick Semansky / AP file

Going in for the records

Last Friday, the House Democrats subpoenaed the Treasury Secretary Mnuchin and IRS Commissioner Rettig to turn over Trump’s tax returns by this Friday. Mnuchin had rejected Committee Chairman Richard Neal’s original request made in April for Trump’s tax documents.

Please explain

Neal’s stated purpose for his original request was to examine how the IRS audits presidents. Secretary Mnuchin rejected the request and stated that it “lacked legitimate legislative purpose.” The Treasury also expressed concerns as to why the request only included Trump’s tax returns and no other presidents' tax returns.


LEANING RIGHT:

Washington Times: House subpoenas Trump tax returns, escalates battle over access

Townhall: Impeachment Bingo: The Democrats Gave The Trump Administration A New Deadline To Turn Over Tax Returns

The right doubts Mr. Neal simply wants to inspect the IRS audit process. They argue that “most scholars” believe Congress could only demand access to tax information if they had a “legitimate legislative purpose”. They report many Democrats for saying that the reason to see the returns was to “embarrass Trump”. This side believes the subpoenas are another Democratic attempt to damage Trump ahead of the 2020 elections.

LEANING LEFT:

NY Daily News: Why Congress needs to see Trump’s taxes: The legislative purpose is compelling

Huffington Post: Democrats Issue Subpoenas For Donald Trump’s Tax Returns

The left argues that the subpoenas were the correct course of action. They point to a “longstanding federal law” that “explicitly” gives Congress the right to get anyone’s tax information. These article note how no previous requests under this law had been denied and believes that the president should not get “special treatment” due to his position. They contend that without the tax documents, Congress cannot monitor to see if the President is acting only in the national interest.


Where’s the common ground?

Both sides agree that Congress has the power to demand access to tax information as long as it has a legitimate purpose. While they disagree if Congress has a legitimate purpose in this case, all the articles predict that this issue will be left up to the courts to resolve.

I hope the court is rational

7a3c5c09-9aa7-45c8-98f0-65e40ab5180f.jpg

 

Share this story!