Green Bay Packers Firing Raises Questions 🏈

Mark Hoffman / USA TODAY Sports

Mark Hoffman / USA TODAY Sports

Sports and social media

Social media platforms like Twitter have made sports more personal for fans by providing an inside look into players’ lives. Some players, like former NFL receiver Chad Ochocinco, even received fines for tweeting during games. Recent happenings show that Twitter may even be impacting professional teams’ operations.

Not all tweets are safe

The NFL's Green Bay Packers recently fired their head coach Mike McCarthy after a poor season. After his firing, McCarthy’s longtime assistant Winston Moss tweeted a criticism of the organization and its star quarterback Aaron Rodgers. Moss was let go a few hours later. Did Moss lose his job because of the tweet?


TWEET GOT HIM FIRED:

Washington Post: A Packers assistant called out Aaron Rodgers and the team on Twitter. Hours later, he was fired.

CBS Sports: Packers fire top assistant Winston Moss hours after tweet about Aaron Rodgers and coaching search

Those that believe a tweet got Moss fired lean on the fact that the tweet criticized QB Aaron Rodgers. Rodgers received a long term contract this summer and some think he has an inordinate influence on team operations. Both articles do state that fired head coach McCarthy considered Moss his right hand man.

IT WASN'T THE TWEET:

NFL: Joe Philbin: Winston Moss firing went beyond tweet

WSMV: Philbin: Winston Moss was let go because of 'fit' with team

Those that believe it wasn't the tweet point to new head coach Joe Philbin’s interview about the firing. They highlight the fact that Moss did not have the best relationship with the media and that Philbin did not think of Moss as a fit.  


So, did Twitter get Moss fired?

It is not uncommon for assistants to accompany fired head coaches out the door. However, Philbin did say that “not one thing got Moss fired” and its possible that Moss’s contentious public presence, tweeting included, contributed to him being labeled as a wrong “fit”. Twitter alone may not decide the fate of someone, but it can contribute to employers’ perception of character.

Maybe Moss will slide into some DMs and get a new job

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